Easter Famous Dish(Baked Ham With Brown Sugar)

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Ingredients:

  • 4-5kg/9-11lb raw smoked ham on the bone
  • 90g/3oz soft brown sugar
  • 6 tbsp wholegrain mustard
  • dark rye bread, sweet sliced pickles and bay leaves, to serve

Method:

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  1. Place the raw ham in a large, clean bucket. Add enough water to cover and soak overnight, or up to 24 hrs ahead, changing the water twice.
  2. Heat oven to 180C/160C fan/gas 4. Drain and place the ham in a large roasting tin, cover tightly with foil and bake for 3 hrs.
  3. Remove the ham from the oven and turn the heat up to 200C/180C fan/gas 6.Using a sharp knife, carefully slice the rind off the ham, leaving about 1-2 cm of fat; cut a diamond-shaped pattern into this. In a small bowl, mix together the sugar and mustard, then rub all over the ham. Roast for 30 mins until the ham is tender and the outside nice and sticky.
  4. Bring to the table on a large platter lined with bay leaves. To serve, cut 1cm-thick slices off the ham to go alongside the rye bread, pickles and mustard sauce (Make your own sauce with our recipe below).

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Haiku Stairs (Stairway to Heaven). The island of Oʻahu, Hawaii

Haiku Stairs:

The Haʻikū Stairs, also known as the Stairway to Heaven or Haʻikū Ladder, is a steep hiking trail on the island of Oʻahu, Hawaii. The total 3,922 steps span along Oahu’s Ko’olau mountain range.

“The Stairway To Heaven” — is one of the most extreme and beautiful hikes Hawaii (and America) has to offer.

For the past 26 years, the hike up the 4,000-step ladder has also been illegal, but that hasn’t stopped people — dozens a day — from making the trek up and down the steel steps that were once operated by the Coast Guard to catch a glimpse of the view at the top of Puu Keahi a Kahoe on the island of Oahu.The stepladder was built in 1943 during World War II to “provide access to buildings at the top of the ridge, used as transmission stations,” according to a tourism site called Best Places Hawaii. 

The ladder scales “nearly vertical” heights over 2,500 feet from Haiku Valley to the top of Puu Keahi a Kahoe, so high that there are points in the hike where the peaks rise above clouds.

It was a popular hiking trail in the 1980s, operated by the coast guard, Though the hike is illegal, tourists (and some locals) attempt to scale the Stairway To Heaven every day.The Honolulu Board of Water Supply, The Huffington Post reports, “has jurisdiction over the hike and requires that anyone who goes up it sign waivers and present a $1 million liability insurance policy.”

In early 2013, a group formed to petition the city to reopen the stairs to the public, but the stairs remain closed.

The best picturegraphy of haiku staires (stairway to  heaven):

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Top 15 Weirdest Food From Around The World!!!!

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It’s time to take a trip around the world and delve into all the weird foods our species like to chow down. Unfortunately, the world isn’t only full of those tasty breakfasts we spoilt you with a while back – if only. Consider this a public service and an education to save you from shock when you come across these, the 50 weirdest foods from around the world.

1-Fried Spider – Cambodia

Available throughout Cambodia, but a specialty in the town of Skuon, these creepy crawlies have been deep fried in garlic oil until crunchy on the outside and gooey on the inside. Typically of the tarantula variety, the practice of eating these spiders may have started during the brutal reign of the Khmer Rouge when villagers had to find alternative sources of food. Spiders are often sold to travellers passing through town and looking for a quick snack. Besides being full of protein, rumour has it that they are even said to increase the beauty of the consumer.

2-Haggis – Scotland

A sheep’s heart, liver and lungs minced and mixed with onions, oatmeal, suet, stock  and seasoned with salt and spices cooked inside the animal’s stomach. Traditionally stuffed into a sheep’s stomach and simmered, this hearty dish dates back to the 1400’s and today is served as the main course of a Burns supper on Robert Burns Day. Typically eaten with tatties and neeps (mashed potatoes and turnips), it is often served with a dram of Scotch whisky to get it all down. Today, Haggis is conveniently available ready-made from the grocery store and is a great source of iron and fibre.

3- Khash – Middle East, East Europe and Turkey

A pretty gruesome little dish made up of stewed cows feet and head. It was once a winter comfort food but is now considered a delicacy. I’m sure it’s fine, so long as you don’t mind that grinning skull staring at you through its cold dead eyes.

4-Sannakji – South Korea

A South Korean delicacy, this dish of live octopus is eaten either whole or in pieces depending on the size of the specimen. Served raw and usually only with a splash of sesame oil, it’s so fresh that the tentacles are still squirming. Suckers from the octopus can attach themselves inside the throat of the consumer causing choking or even death, which makes eating this mollusk a scary proposition. Although the actual octopus is mildly flavoured, the live animal wrapping itself around the diners.

5-Tuna eyeball – Japan

Although it sounds nasty, apparently it’s rather tame, tasting pretty similar to squid or octopus. None of the gunk you’d normally associate with slicing up eyeballs.

6-Rocky Mountain Oysters

What is so strange about oysters? Probably the fact that they’re not the kind you find at the bottom of the ocean, but rather a fancy name given to deep-fried testicles of a buffalo, bull or boar. Rocky Mountain oysters (also called Prairie Oysters) are well-known and regularly enjoyed, in certain parts of the United States and Canada, generally where cattle ranching is prevalent. The testicles are peeled, boiled, rolled in a flour mixture, and fried, then generally served with a nice cocktail sauce.

7-Shiokara – Japan

Now this really does sound bad. A dish made of pieces of meat taken from a selection of sea creatures, served in a brown, viscous paste of their own salted and fermented viscera. Oh, I forgot to say, it’s all served raw.

8-Wasp crackers – Japan

Yep, you guessed it, it’s a biscuit filled with wasps. Think chocolate chip cookies, only the insects replace the choccy chips. Apparently the digger wasp, which the biscuit contains, has a pretty mean sting.

9-Jing leed (Grasshoppers) – Thailand

So, yes, this is a big old grasshopper seasoned with salt, pepper power and chilli and fried in a big wok. Tastes a little like hollow popcorn skin… except a little juice squirts out when you bite.

10-Beondegi – Korea

Simply boiled or steamed and lightly seasoned, this is popular snack all over Korea and usually sold from street vendors. Apparently they taste like wood.

11-Witchetty grub – Australian

Part of the Australian ‘bushmeat’ family, this was another staple of Indigenous Australians in the desert. These can either be eaten raw, when it tastes like almonds, or lightly cooked, where its skin crisps like roast chicken and its insides take on the look and consistency of scrambled egg.

12-Escargots à la bourguignonne – France

Snails cooked in a sauce of white wine, garlic, butter and parsley served in their shells. Said to have a similar consistency to mussels or clams, though I found them to be pretty rubbery. Perhaps best to try in a decent, reasonably priced restaurant rather than the satay version down a back street in Hong Kong.

13-Pickled egg – UK

Pretty much summed up in the name, this is a hardboiled egg that been left to go cold and stuck in a jar of vinegar. The sour liquid penetrates right to the heart, meaning the powdery yolk in the centre is uncomfortably sour.

14- Frogs legs – France, Southeast Asia and other

What’s there to say? Basically the back end and back legs of a frog, grilled, baked, fried or stewed. With the texture of chicken with a very faint taste of fish, it’s one of my favourite kind of meats.

15-Crocodile – Australia, Southeast Asia and Africa

crocodile meat is considered a delicacy in many places around the world, supposedly tasting like a cross between chicken and crab. Although crocodiles are protected in many parts of the world, crocodile meat is usually farmed, so is sustainable if not particularly kind or natural.

 

 

EGYPTIAN PYRAMIDS

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The Egyptian pyramids are ancient pyramid-shaped masonry structures located in Egypt. As of November 2008, there are sources citing both 118 and 138 as the number of identified Egyptian pyramids. Most were built as tombs for the country’s pharaohs and their consorts during the Old and Middle Kingdom periods.

Most famous pyramids:

The most famous Egyptian pyramids are those found at Giza, on the outskirts of Cairo. Several of the Giza pyramids are counted among the largest structures ever built. The Pyramid of Khufu at Giza is the largest Egyptian pyramid. It is the only one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World still in existence.

Number and location of pyramids:

In 1842 Karl Richard Lepsius produced the first modern list of pyramids – see Lepsius list of pyramids – in which he counted 67. A great many more have since been discovered. As of November 2008, 118 Egyptian pyramids have been identified.

Abu Rawash:

Abu Rawash is the site of Egypt’s most northerly pyramid (other than the ruins of Lepsius pyramid number one) the mostly ruinedPyramid of Djedefre, son and successor of Khufu. Originally it was thought that this pyramid had never been completed, but the current archaeological consensus is that not only was it completed, but that it was originally about the same size as the Pyramid of Menkaure, which would have placed it among the half-dozen or so largest pyramids in Egypt.

Giza:

Giza is the location of the Pyramid of Khufu (also known as the “Great Pyramid” and the “Pyramid of Cheops”); the somewhat smaller Pyramid of Khafre (or Kephren); the relatively modest-sized Pyramid of Menkaure (or Mykerinus), along with a number of smaller satellite edifices known as “Queen’s pyramids”; and the Great Sphinx.

The Giza Necropolis has been a popular tourist destination since antiquity, and was popularized in Hellenistic times when the Great Pyramid was listed by Antipater of Sidon as one of the Seven Wonders of the World.

Zawyet el-Aryan:

This site, halfway between Giza and Abu Sir, is the location for two unfinished Old Kingdom pyramids. The northern structure’s owner is believed to be pharaoh Nebka, while the southern structure, known as the Layer Pyramid, may be attributable to the Third Dynasty pharaoh Khaba, a close successor of Sekhemkhet.

Abu Sir:

There are a total of fourteen pyramids at this site, which served as the main royal necropolis during the Fifth Dynasty. The quality of construction of the Abu Sir pyramids is inferior to those of the Fourth Dynasty.

The three major pyramids are those of Niuserre, which is also the best preserved, Neferirkare Kakai and Sahure. The site is also home to the incomplete Pyramid of Neferefre. Most of the major pyramids at Abu Sir were built similar construction techniques, comprising a rubble core surrounded by steps of mud bricks with a limestone outer casing. The largest of these 5th Dynasty pyramids, the Pyramid of Neferirkare Kakai, is believed to have originally been built as a step pyramid some 70 m (230 ft) high and then later transformed into a “true” pyramid by having its steps filled in with loose masonry.

Saqqara:

Major pyramids located here include the Step Pyramid of Djoser – generally identified as the world’s oldest substantial monumental structure to be built of dressed stone – the Pyramid of Userkaf, the Pyramid of Teti and the Pyramid of Merikare, dating to the First Intermediate Period. Also at Saqqara is the Pyramid of Unas, which retains a pyramid causeway that is one of the best-preserved in Egypt. Together with the pyramid of Userkaf, this pyramid was the subject of one of the earliest known restoration attempts, conducted byKhaemweset, a son of Ramesses II.