Tag Archives: landscape

4 ‘Alien’ Skulls That Science Cannot Explain

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Nearly in every corner of the globe, someone has managed to find or excavate mysteries skulls that defy explanation. Whether these mysterious skulls are of human origin or not, is an ongoing debate among skeptics, researchers and those who firmly believe that the mysterious skulls, which do not resemble any human species, are in fact of extraterrestrial origin, and as such, can and should be interpreted as the ultimate evidence that proves that our planet has been visited by beings not from Earth.

This is why in this article, we bring you of the most amazing skulls ever discovered on Earth that hint to a possible extraterrestrial origin.

The Paracas skulls:

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the barren landscape of the Peruvian desert, in 1928, archeologist Julio Tello made one of the most mysterious discoveries when he uncovered a complex and sophisticated graveyard under the harsh soil of the Paracas desert. Tello discovered a set of controversial human remains that would forever change how we look at our ancestor and our origins. The bodies in the tombs had some of the largest elongated skulls ever discovered on the planet, called the Paracas skulls. The Peruvian archeologist discovered over 300 mysterious skulls which are believed to be at least around 3000 years old.

The Rhodope Skull:

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The anomalous skull weighs only 250 grams, it has six mysterious cavities which according to UFO enthusiasts, could belong the creatures ‘sensory organs’. According to the skull formation, the creature to which the skull belonged could have had up to six eyes, or another set of ‘unknown organs’. The most mysterious feature of the Rhodope Skull is that it lacks a mouth.

The Sealand Skull:

It is one of the most controversial artifacts discovered in recent years. The Sealand Skull has raised numerous questions that science cannot find an answer to.something that could change the way we look at human origins and our entire history.It was in 2010 that the skull was first examined at the College of Veterinary Medicine in Denmark. The researchers concluded that they were not able to solve the mystery nor provide anything that would explain to what species it belonged to.

“Although it resembles a mammal, certain characteristics make it impossible to fit into the Linnaean Taxonomy”, scientists said. Since researchers were unable to provide further details and the question regarding the Sealand Skull were many, the skull was sent to the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen. Carbon dating revealed that this mysterious being lived between 1200 and 1280 BC.

Russian Alien skulls:

According to reports by Russian newspapers, the mysterious skulls were found in a cave on Mount Bolshoi Tjach nearly two years ago by a group of explorers led by ethnographer Vladimir Melikov. According to Melikov, the creature of one of the skulls was unlike anything known to man, and it walked on two legs. Melikov states that among the most mysterious features of the skulls is the absence of cranial vault and jaws. The eye sockets are unusually large having facial features resembling humans. Even when compared with the skull of a bear, it’s hard to think that you do not have in your hands the remains of an alien creature, said Melikov. Paleontologists in Moscow weren’t too excited when they received photographs of the mysterious skulls, they merely acknowledged that the skulls are unlike anything they had ever seen, suggesting that the skulls could have been submerged and exposed to sand for long periods of time, something that could have altered the shape of the skulls, but, if this were the case, how can we explain the nearly identical ‘deformations’ in both skulls which seem to follow similar patterns?

5 Most Remote Places In Human Civilization

5 most remote places

1-Mêdog County, China

Is a county of the Nyingtri Prefecture in the Tibet Autonomous Region of People’s Republic of China. Chinese claims include parts of Arunachal Pradesh, south of the McMahon Line, what was casus belli for the 1962 Sino-Indian War.
Medog has a favourable climate caused by the relatively low elevations in parts of the county (down to just 600 m above sea level in the Yarlung Zangbo river valley)

The area is lush and covered with trees and includes the Medog National Animal and Plant Reserve Area. It has more than 3,000 species of plants, 42 species of rare animals under special state protection, and over a thousand hexapod species.
Mêdog used to be the last county without a permanent road access in China, due to the landscape of being surrounded by several high-elevation mountain ranges. A first, simple road was built in 1970s, nevertheless it was usually blocked by ice and snow on the mountains in the winter, made it only a seasonal access. In December 2010, the Chinese government announced a project of renovating the road into a permanent highway from Bomê to Mêdog County,[2] including excavation of a new tunnel under the mountain range. The renovation was completed in 2013.

2-Alert, Canada

Remote Places Alert Canada

Alert, in the Qikiqtaaluk Region, Nunavut, Canada, is the northernmost permanently inhabited place in the world, 817 kilometres (508 mi) from the North Pole.Its permanent population was reported as zero in the 2011 census, but military and scientific personnel on rotation were present. It takes its name from HMS Alert, which wintered 10 km (6.2 mi) east of the present station, off what is now Cape Sheridan,

Alert has many temporary inhabitants as it hosts a military signals intelligenceradio receiving facility at Canadian Forces Station Alert (CFS Alert), as well as a co-located Environment Canada weather station, a Global Atmosphere Watch(GAW) atmosphere monitoring laboratory, and the Alert Airport. Shortly after the end of World War II, Charles J. Hubbard began to rouse interest in the United States and Canada for the establishment of a network ofArctic stations. His plan, in broad perspective, envisaged the establishment of two main stations, one in Greenland and the other within the Archipelago, which could be reached by sea supply. These main stations would then serve as advance bases from which a number of smaller stations would be established by air.

3-Tristan da Cunha

Tristan da Cunha colloquially Tristan, is both a remote group of volcanic islands in the south Atlantic Ocean and the main island of that group. It is the most remote inhabited archipelago in the world, lying 2,000 kilometres from the nearest inhabited land, Saint Helena, 2,400 kilometres from the nearest continental land, South Africa, and 3,360 kilometres from South America. The territory consists of the main island, also named Tristan da Cunha, which has a north–south length of 11.27 kilometres and has an area of 98 square kilometres, along with the smaller, uninhabited Nightingale Islands and the wildlife reserves of Inaccessibleand Gough Islands.Tristan da Cunha is part of the British overseas territory of Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha. This includes Saint Helena and equatorialAscension Island some 3,730 kilometres to the north of Tristan. The island has a population of 301 as of September 2015.

4-McMurdo Station, Antarctica

Located quite literally at the bottom of the world, Antarctica is naturally one of the most remote places on Earth. Though there are no permanent residents in the frozen region, the continent does house seasonal researchers and scientist.
The McMurdo Station, located on the northern tip of Antarctica, is the most populated research centers, with close to 1,200 scientists working in the area. Though extremely isolated from neighboring countries, there are three airstrips in McMurdo, which means the inhabitants can easily access the region, as well as many modern amenities.

5-Ittoqqortoormiit, Greenland

If you think the name is hard to pronounce, try being one of the 500 people living in this desolate area. The village is located on the eastern shore of Greenland and is just north of Iceland. Greenland’s the one with all the ice, so the water surrounding the town are frozen almost year-round, making access to the region via boat near impossible. Furthermore, the small airport on the island rarely hosts flights.
The majority of the population lives off hunting and fishing, with polar bears and whales the most commonly hunted animals.