Tag Archives: Most Remote Places

Haiku Stairs (Stairway to Heaven). The island of Oʻahu, Hawaii

Haiku Stairs:

The Haʻikū Stairs, also known as the Stairway to Heaven or Haʻikū Ladder, is a steep hiking trail on the island of Oʻahu, Hawaii. The total 3,922 steps span along Oahu’s Ko’olau mountain range.

“The Stairway To Heaven” — is one of the most extreme and beautiful hikes Hawaii (and America) has to offer.

For the past 26 years, the hike up the 4,000-step ladder has also been illegal, but that hasn’t stopped people — dozens a day — from making the trek up and down the steel steps that were once operated by the Coast Guard to catch a glimpse of the view at the top of Puu Keahi a Kahoe on the island of Oahu.The stepladder was built in 1943 during World War II to “provide access to buildings at the top of the ridge, used as transmission stations,” according to a tourism site called Best Places Hawaii. 

The ladder scales “nearly vertical” heights over 2,500 feet from Haiku Valley to the top of Puu Keahi a Kahoe, so high that there are points in the hike where the peaks rise above clouds.

It was a popular hiking trail in the 1980s, operated by the coast guard, Though the hike is illegal, tourists (and some locals) attempt to scale the Stairway To Heaven every day.The Honolulu Board of Water Supply, The Huffington Post reports, “has jurisdiction over the hike and requires that anyone who goes up it sign waivers and present a $1 million liability insurance policy.”

In early 2013, a group formed to petition the city to reopen the stairs to the public, but the stairs remain closed.

The best picturegraphy of haiku staires (stairway to  heaven):

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5 Most Remote Places In Human Civilization

5 most remote places

1-Mêdog County, China

Is a county of the Nyingtri Prefecture in the Tibet Autonomous Region of People’s Republic of China. Chinese claims include parts of Arunachal Pradesh, south of the McMahon Line, what was casus belli for the 1962 Sino-Indian War.
Medog has a favourable climate caused by the relatively low elevations in parts of the county (down to just 600 m above sea level in the Yarlung Zangbo river valley)

The area is lush and covered with trees and includes the Medog National Animal and Plant Reserve Area. It has more than 3,000 species of plants, 42 species of rare animals under special state protection, and over a thousand hexapod species.
Mêdog used to be the last county without a permanent road access in China, due to the landscape of being surrounded by several high-elevation mountain ranges. A first, simple road was built in 1970s, nevertheless it was usually blocked by ice and snow on the mountains in the winter, made it only a seasonal access. In December 2010, the Chinese government announced a project of renovating the road into a permanent highway from Bomê to Mêdog County,[2] including excavation of a new tunnel under the mountain range. The renovation was completed in 2013.

2-Alert, Canada

Remote Places Alert Canada

Alert, in the Qikiqtaaluk Region, Nunavut, Canada, is the northernmost permanently inhabited place in the world, 817 kilometres (508 mi) from the North Pole.Its permanent population was reported as zero in the 2011 census, but military and scientific personnel on rotation were present. It takes its name from HMS Alert, which wintered 10 km (6.2 mi) east of the present station, off what is now Cape Sheridan,

Alert has many temporary inhabitants as it hosts a military signals intelligenceradio receiving facility at Canadian Forces Station Alert (CFS Alert), as well as a co-located Environment Canada weather station, a Global Atmosphere Watch(GAW) atmosphere monitoring laboratory, and the Alert Airport. Shortly after the end of World War II, Charles J. Hubbard began to rouse interest in the United States and Canada for the establishment of a network ofArctic stations. His plan, in broad perspective, envisaged the establishment of two main stations, one in Greenland and the other within the Archipelago, which could be reached by sea supply. These main stations would then serve as advance bases from which a number of smaller stations would be established by air.

3-Tristan da Cunha

Tristan da Cunha colloquially Tristan, is both a remote group of volcanic islands in the south Atlantic Ocean and the main island of that group. It is the most remote inhabited archipelago in the world, lying 2,000 kilometres from the nearest inhabited land, Saint Helena, 2,400 kilometres from the nearest continental land, South Africa, and 3,360 kilometres from South America. The territory consists of the main island, also named Tristan da Cunha, which has a north–south length of 11.27 kilometres and has an area of 98 square kilometres, along with the smaller, uninhabited Nightingale Islands and the wildlife reserves of Inaccessibleand Gough Islands.Tristan da Cunha is part of the British overseas territory of Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha. This includes Saint Helena and equatorialAscension Island some 3,730 kilometres to the north of Tristan. The island has a population of 301 as of September 2015.

4-McMurdo Station, Antarctica

Located quite literally at the bottom of the world, Antarctica is naturally one of the most remote places on Earth. Though there are no permanent residents in the frozen region, the continent does house seasonal researchers and scientist.
The McMurdo Station, located on the northern tip of Antarctica, is the most populated research centers, with close to 1,200 scientists working in the area. Though extremely isolated from neighboring countries, there are three airstrips in McMurdo, which means the inhabitants can easily access the region, as well as many modern amenities.

5-Ittoqqortoormiit, Greenland

If you think the name is hard to pronounce, try being one of the 500 people living in this desolate area. The village is located on the eastern shore of Greenland and is just north of Iceland. Greenland’s the one with all the ice, so the water surrounding the town are frozen almost year-round, making access to the region via boat near impossible. Furthermore, the small airport on the island rarely hosts flights.
The majority of the population lives off hunting and fishing, with polar bears and whales the most commonly hunted animals.